Sunday, May 21, 2017

Is Humanism a Religion?


Is Humanism a religion?  I contend that Humanism does not qualify, but it is compatible with religious experience. Beginning with how religion was defined in ancient times, I argue that the element or aspect of transcendence is vital. I then look at whether transcendence is and could be in Humanism.

Religio, religionis (f, Latin) is translated principally as "supernatural constraint or taboo" or "obligation," in line with the verb religare (to bind). Secondary meanings of religio include "sanctity" and "reverence, respect, awe." In short, the etymology of religion indicates that the phenomenon is based on the binding nature of a religious object that is transcendent (i.e., not based in our realm, including Nature), hence the supernatural attribute or manifestation associated with the nature of the binding, or obligation. So religion is not based on feeling obliged to respect Nature. Hence the ancient nature religions had as a core belief the notion that deities, which are not based in our realm, control various features of Nature. For example, Zeus controls lightning, and Poseidon causes storms on the seas. Somethings (i.e., deities) were premised to exist that transcend Nature. Therefore, Nature itself not get us far enough in referring to religion even in the nature religions. In theism, too, a religious object is believed to exist that is "other-worldly" and hence supernatural.

I submit that the discerning attribute of religion is its transcendence, which does not in itself require a belief in a deity (i.e., that an intelligent being with a personality exists "out there"). It follows that respecting human potential, which is ensconced in Nature, does not get us to religion. Feuerbach gives divine status to Nature, and, more specifically to the potential that our species naturally has (i.e., our better instincts). He defines "divine" simply as "supreme," but in doing so he goes against (and ignores) the religious connotations of the word. Furthermore, to say that the divine is human potential risks a tautology in that virtually any human aspiration or goal is divine. What then is left for the profane? Moreover, is not it self-idolatrous to set natural human potential/goals as divine--as if we are the ultimate source?

To be religious, I submit, an experience or religious object must transcend human artifices, and in fact our domain. In fact, the transcendence goes beyond the limit of human cognition and perception. Humanism falls short in this regard and is thus not a religion. To be sure, humanism can be spiritual, as a human urge undoubtedly exists for yearning for transcendence experientially or communion with a transcendent object. This is fully compatible with Humanism, for it can be held that the human brain has an instinctual urge—admittedly stronger in some people than others—to yearn for going beyond the brain’s own limits of cognition, feeling, and perception. There is nothing inconsistent with Humanists gathering together to engage in transcendent experience itself—the focus being on the yearning rather than of course any religious object. All that is really needed, I submit, is that the person focus on a transcendent reference point. Interestingly, a point has no area, so no attributes other than being transcendent would apply anyway in this Humanist approach to religious experience. Yet this approach is not consistent with the Humanist default that esteems human potential in nature/society.

Accordingly, Humanism in the limited sense that it is commonly "understood" does not qualify as a religion for lack of transcendence. To niggardly hold to the ideologically constrained common view and presumptuously erase and replace the default meaning of religion does not do justice either to Humanism or religion. Like the "other shore" in Buddhism, the very existence of the abyss that Humanists and Theists alike insist separates Humanism and religion is, I submit, an illusion foisted by narrow-minded, partisan ideology. Humanism is not, but could be, religious.



Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Realive: Lazarus Reanimated!

In 2016, Robert McIntyre, a graduate of MIT, became the first person to freeze and then revive a mammalian brain—that of a white rabbit. “When thawed, the rabbit’s brain was found to have all of its synapse, cell membranes, and intracellular structures intact.”[1] The film, Realive, made that same year, is a fictional story about a man with terminal cancer who commits suicide to be frozen and revived when his illness could be cured. In the context of McIntyre’s scientific work, the film’s sci-fi demeanor belies the very real possibility that cryogenics could realistically alter fundamental assumptions about life and death even just later in the same century. What the film says about the life and death is timeless, however, in terms of philosophical value.

The full essay is at "Realive."

Monday, May 8, 2017

Spirituality as Distinctively Religious

To be at its fullest, the notion of spiritual leadership applied to business should not shirk the religious basis of spirituality to make it somehow more fitting to business-or a certain rendition of business. Many of Gilbert Fairholm’s descriptions of spirituality risk embalming spirituality in a secular tomb in keeping with the bias typically found in the business world against anything religious. Fortunately, some of his other characterizations of the term provide an alternative basis for an invigorated notion of spiritual leadership applied even in the business world.

To be sure, the increasing secularity enveloping Western society in the last half of the twentieth century doubtlessly supplied the gravitational pull under which the leadership scholar crafted his business-friendly notion of spirituality. Even so, his survey of managers on the topic must have swayed most—but crucially not all—of his characterizations.  “In a work context,” Fairholm explains, “spirituality is perceived to include a much broader range of experience while religion and faith are seen as limiting the discussion to experiences that arise in traditional religious institutions or ways of thinking.”[1] Most of the managers had non-religious, even secular, conceptions of spirituality. Morality figured prominently for the managers who believed that success in “leading on the basis of spirit is . . . based on a mutually accepted cultural morality”; the task of the leader being to create such a culture and then foster its “values and customs” among followers.[2] More narrowly, those managers believed that spirituality “in organizations refers to the inner values of the leader and the followers.”[3] Spirituality is essentially tucked into corporate culture, such that spiritual leadership is made more palatable in business terms yet at the cost of only a wan or enervated spiritual aspect remaining. Put another way, spirituality itself gets remade into leadership itself. In “standing for something bigger than you that others can believe in also,” spirituality “is also leadership.”[4] In fact, spirituality “is the quintessence of leadership.”[5] The managerial view of spirituality, as “those essential human values that teach us how our basic humanity fits within the overall scheme of things and how we can attain harmony in life and in our work,” is “the essence of leadership” when manifested.[6] Why then even use the expression, spiritual leadership then? Why not simply call it leadership and be rid of any inconvenient religious connotations?

In stating that spirituality “does not apply to particular religions,” Fairholm himself treats religion as if it had become taboo, although he does admit, “the values of some religions may be a part of a person’s spiritual focus.”[7]  To wit, he insists that there is “a clear difference between spirituality in religion, founded on sacred writ, and the spirit or soul of people, defined holistically as body and spirit, of the head and the heart. . . . spirit, a life-giving principle, that is concerned also with higher moral qualities.”[8] The problem here is that soul is a religious term, so it does not reduce to morality, and yet Fairholm characterizes spirituality as “the activating mechanism of our moral character” and declares that spiritual leaders are “moral leaders,” as if the two kinds of leadership were synonymous.[9]

Even so, Fairholm reports that some managers view spirituality as a “personal belief system” that highlights “being true to [a person’s own] beliefs, . . . internal values and ethics.”[10] This view effectively secularizes spirituality as a sort of ethical authenticity or integrity. Lest integrity be thought to have a religious tinge here in being “a function of feeling whole, total, connected,” its necessary use of self-discipline suggests that the wholeness or totality consists of a person’s motive, word, and deed rather than anything greater, such as communion with God.[11]

It bears stressing that religious faith does not reduce to morality; in fact, they may contradict each other. Kierkegaard, for example, points to the divine command given to Abraham to sacrifice his only son, Isaac. “The ethical expression for what Abraham did is that he was willing to murder Isaac; the religious expression is that he was willing to sacrifice Isaac.”[12] It is only with respect to faith that the father of a faith is willing to murder his son, and herein lies the basic contradiction between a faith of divine decrees and a human moral system. Put another way, omnipotence (i.e., being all-powerful) cannot by its very nature be confined to fit within a moral system. What God wills is right because it is so willed.[13] Grace itself “is arbitrary love” because grace can also “condemn its object; thus it is a groundless, unessential, arbitrary, absolutely subjective, merely personal love.”[14] Abraham searches in vain for any ethical justification “for suspending the ethical duty to the son.”[15] Abraham’s higher duty is to do God’s will—and so to be wholly dependent on God’s grace. Accordingly, “the ethical is thus teleologically suspended.”[16] Abraham’s telos, or overriding goal, is to comply with the divine command “for the sake of God because God demands this proof of his faith.”[17] In faith, Abraham is an individual—a particular—above the universal, the moral.

In fact, a malevolent principle capable of immoral acts may be part of the very nature of faith. Within faith, says Feuerbach, “lies a malignant principle.”[18] The prejudiced nature of faith—its “(d)ogmatic, exclusive, scrupulous particularly”—does not play out among the faithful, but, rather, against heretics qua unbelievers.[19] This is so in any religion. Hence in Christianity, it is Christian faith that “is the ultimate ground” of the persecution of heretics.[20] “Faith recognizes man only on condition that he recognizes God.”[21] To the person who does not believe in the divine personality, religious hatred, it should be admitted, comes naturally, eclipsing even “universalistic” Christian neighbor-love. “He is not for Christ is against him; that which is not chiristian is antichristian.”[22] It would be to dishonor God to love those who dishonor God. “Hence faith has fellowship with believers only; unbelievers it rejects. It is well-disposed towards believers, but ill-disposed towards unbelievers.”[23] Hence Luther declares, “What I cannot love with God, I must hate; if they only preach something which is against God, all love and friendship is destoyed;--thereupon I hate thee, and do thee no good. For faith must be uppermost, and where the word of God is attacked, hate takes the place of love.”[24] Yet does not hate actually attack a deity which Augustine points out is love itself? Even so, Luther insists, “Rather than God’s word should fall and heresy stand, faith would wish all creatures to be destroyed; for through heresy men lose God himself.”[25] Is it not rather through hatred though? That even a faith of love admits so readily of partiality and thus of hatred suggests that malevolence enjoys a place at the table of faith, even crowding out morality. It follows that to reduce spirituality to morality is to seriously alter, or disfigure, faith.

Even so, Fairholm maintains that “(s)pirituality provides a moral point of view that reflects the cognitive and affective foundations of a mature conscience.”[26] Reave goes even further, bringing in the religious basis of spirituality. “The voice of conscience and values often comes from religious teachings or a spiritual sense of connection with a Higher Power or God.”[27] To be sure, “It is true that ethical values may be enacted without spiritual faith or intention. However, true spirituality cannot be demonstrated without ethical values.” [28] Spirituality must therefore provide a moral point of view.

Given the affective (i.e., of feelings, or sentiments) element of the foundation of a spiritual/moral conscience, Fairholm’s notion of spirituality may rest not on a moral basis; the foundation even of morality be sentiments. David Hume’s ethical theory provides a grounding for the ethics-feelings linkage; he considered the ethical judgment to simply be the sentiments of approbation (i.e., approval) and disapprobation. Determining an intent or act to be unethical is simply feeling the sentiment of disapprobation. Feuerbach provides the spirituality-sentiment linkage in his claim that “spirit is nothing outside of and without sensibility.” In fact, “spirit is only the essence, the sense, the spirit of the senses.” Because “God is nothing other than spirit conceived as universal,” God is therefore is actually of human sentiments.[29]

It is not surprising, therefore, that Fairholm found that for some managers, spirituality “is an emotional level, a feeling”—how we feel emotionally in soul and body.[30] Yet such a soul is limited to the emotional state of a person—hence a psychological rather than a religious construct, the confines of which are on this side of life. Similarly, as “the side of us that is searching for meaning, values, ethics, and life purposes,” spirituality is to some managers “any doctrine or philosophy that lifts us and gives meaning to our lives.”[31] Meaning, and that which we value and hold as ethical, can be well within life’s purposes, which in turn are literally biological in nature. A person’s life-force can be viewed as being similarly this-worldly.

Spirituality, Fairholm writes, “primarily has to do with our inner or private being, our ‘life-force.”[32] A person’s life-force is literally one’s energy. Spirit “is the essential, energizing force or principle in each person, the core of self.”[33] Although he suggests that “spirituality connotes the essence of who we are, our inner self, separate from the purely physical, but including the physical,”[34] here he has in mind the energizing part of the self. “The spiritual in us describes the animating or life-giving principle within us.”[35] It resides in a person, and yet Fairholm includes an other-worldly aspect. “Spirit refers to aliveness, the vitality dwelling in our body, the fountain of our energy. It involves constant spiritual awareness. Both the spiritual and the worldly coexist as a unified whole, overlapping.”[36] Notably, spirituality “in religious (doctrinaire) terms . . . is the quality . . . of recognizing the intangible, life-affirming force in self and all human beings. It is a state of intimate relationship with the inner self of higher values and morality.”[37] Yet such higher values have a human ceiling on account of the association with morality. “Spirit is each person’s vital, energizing force or principle, the core of self. It is inseparable from self. It is the fertile, invisible realm that is the wellspring for our species’ creativity and morality.”[38] As inseparable from self, the energizing force in a person may well be laudable morally speaking, but the transcendent element of spirituality is absent.

Even in Fairholm’s characterization of spiritual capacities as “a significant, even vital, part of our true self,”—a person’s spirituality being “the essence of who he or she is,” “rooted in our true nature”—such authenticity is in itself secular.[39] Managers who view spirituality as the essence of a person—the “inner self”—provide a “secular definition of the essence of the person.”[40] Likewise, spirit as “the part of us that we use or rely upon for comfort, strength, and happiness”—a view held many managers—is in personal rather than “metaphysical” terms.[41]  In other words, spirituality as “the deep inner self, striving for inner peace, happiness, contentment, meaning, purpose,” can be interpreted in a secular sense as personal development and satisfaction.[42]

Fairholm’s references to internal values in spirituality also deny the distinctly religious origin of the term.  For example, he states, “Spirituality is the process of living out a set of deeply held personal values, of honoring forces greater than the self.”[43]  A “relationship with something intangible, beyond the self” can still be within our realm—this worldly.[44] That is to say, going beyond the self is not necessarily religious in nature; Cicero’s other-concerning ethic involves going beyond the self, first to family, then on to friends. Yet in characterizing forces greater than the self as “a presence,” Fairholm provides a religious tint to the values in that they are oriented to an external being (i.e., God).[45] Even so, as just discussed, if the values are oriented to ethics and life purposes, the something beyond the self is this-worldly.

Fairholm reports that a significant proportion of managers view spirituality as “an inner awareness that makes integration of the self and world possible.”[46] This, according to the managers, is the essence of what distinguishes our species from all the others. Relatedly, Fairholm also reports that some managers in his study defined spirituality “as the acceptance of universal values.”[47] Accordingly, “we can define spiritual as the essential human values from around the world and across time that teach us how humanity belongs within the greater scheme of circumstance and how we can realize harmony in life and work.”[48] He believes that spirituality defined in this way “is critical to understanding organizational life and leadership.”[49] Such a wholeness, however, falls short of communion with something intangible that transcends the limits of human cognition, feeling, and perception, so the experience cannot be regarded as spiritual in a religious sense. Neither, by the way, is integration of individuals and an organization, such as a business, rightly spiritual in nature.

Nevertheless, a distinctly religious tint can be gleamed from some of Fairholm’s other characterizations of spirituality and two views he found held by managers; these descriptions can be useful, therefore, in carving out spirituality as distinct from ethics and life purposes such as contentment and happiness. In some of his characterizations of spirituality, Fairholm uses distinctly religious terms. For example, he points to a dictionary definition of spirituality that includes “the soul or inner nature of humans.”[50] He adds, “Spirituality enlarges our soul and gives it purpose.”[51]  The term soul is of course distinctively religious—a person’s soul being that which seeks its home in another realm, in God. A soul is not biological energy; nor is the aim simply being ethical or valuing life. Lest theism be frowned on, soul can be said to be that of a person which yearns for beyondness; the soul is that of a human being that is drawn to the experience of transcendence, whether oriented to an external religious object or inwardly in a qualitatively different sort of experience—as “inner consciousness.”[52]  Fairholm reports that some managers view spirituality as partaking “of the transcendent. It is acting out in thought and deeds the experience of the transcendent in human life.”[53] Transcendence holds in abeyance our experience of daily life—and even ordinary experience itself—with “an eye” oriented beyond the limits of human cognition and perception.  This view is thus in sync with the theistic belief in the divine as a deity.

Fairholm found that some managers viewed spirituality as an inner conviction if a higher, more intelligent force, which is not far from the view of God as an intelligent being. Spirituality is here the awareness that certain intangible principles or beliefs defy logical proof and in fact may seem impossible and yet be deemed trustworthy and valuable nonetheless. Such spirituality as faith highlights having a relationship with the higher power. Fairholm concludes that this managerial view of spirituality retains “strong religious overtones.”[54] Transcending the limits of our cognition (e.g., logic) and what we can perceive and even feel, God has a wholly other quality even though anthropomorphic trappings are—according to David Hume—inevitable given the nature of the mind. Nevertheless, Fairholm’s claim that spirituality “implies a relationship with something beyond the self” can be taken in a religious sense.[55] Hence spiritual leadership cannot be synonymous with ethical leadership. Nor can spiritual leadership just be about establishing harmony in corporate culture, the world or even life. Instead, such leadership must involve some sense of transcendence—an orientation beyond our world—and with real relevance in an utterly profane context such as business. In short, spiritual leadership combines two qualitatively different elements—spirituality and business-leadership—maintaining the integrity of both parts rather than caving one into the other.




1. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 73; Fairholm is drawing on Peter Vaill, Managing as a Performing Art (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1989).


2. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 15.


3. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 219.


4. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 25.


5. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 54.


6. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 73.


7. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 29.


8. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 74.


9. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 192, 187.


10. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 31; Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 121.


11. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 144.


12. Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (London: Penguin Books, 1985): 60.


13. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 320.


14. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 320.


15. Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (London: Penguin Books, 1985): 86.


16. Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (London: Penguin Books, 1985): 90.


17. Soren Kierkegaard, Fear and Trembling (London: Penguin Books, 1985): 88.


18. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 252


19. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 251.


20. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 321.


21. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 321.


22. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 251.


23. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 252.


24. Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 325.


25.Ludwig Feuerbach, The Essence of Christianity (New York: Harper & Brothers, 1957): 325.


26. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 75.


27. Reave, Laura. “Spiritual Values and Practices Related to Leadership Effectiveness,” The Leadership Quarterly 16 (2005): 664-65


28. Reave, Laura. “Spiritual Values and Practices Related to Leadership Effectiveness,” The Leadership Quarterly 16 (2005): 665


29. Ludwig Feuerbach, Lectures on the Essence of Religion, Ralph Manheim, trans. (New York: Harper and Row, 1967), 86-87


30. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 31.


31. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 121; Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


32. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 119.


33. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 79.


34. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 73.


35. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 25.


36. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 56.


37. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 29.


38. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 24.


39. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 130, 132, 29, 75.


40.  Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


41. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


42. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 56; See Jack Hawley, Reawakening the Spirit in Work: The Power of Dharmic Management (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 1993).


43. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 131.


44. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 121.


45. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 107.


46. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 120; Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


47. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


48. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997); See Berry Heerman, “Spiritual Core Is essential to High Performing Teams,” In The New Leaders (San Francisco: Sterling and Stone, March/April, 1995).


49. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


50. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 219.


51. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 131.


52. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 65.


53. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 31. See Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 121.


54. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Capturing the Heart of Leadership: Spirituality and Community in the New American Workplace (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997): 30.


55. Gilbert W. Fairholm, Perspectives on Leadership: From the Science of Management to Its Spiritual Heart (Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1998): 130, 132.